Archive for the 'Random' Category

Video Game Quote #1

Are you sure you want to quit before finishing my story?

After I formatted my PC, installed Windows 7 (best decision I’ve ever made) and reinstalled Prince of Persia: Sands of Time (losing all my progress), I’m back on track with the game.

Although I’ve only completed 25% of the game, it’s the best game I’ve ever played.

The quote I chose is probably the most stupid one I could choose. It’s what the Prince tells you when you want to quit the game, but silly as it sounds, it made me think of tens of ways to use it in real life.
Like I could’ve told my ex girlfriend just that… “Hey… Don’t leave me… Are you sure you want to quit before finishing my story?”, although I could’ve changed “my” for “our”: after all, relationships are something you share and not something that’s exclusive to one of the parts.

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With your every move

Lately I’ve been thinking that it’s while facing everyday decisions that we put who we want to be to test. You define and redefine who you are with your every move.

Just some random Facebook wisdom I put out every once in a while.

Speaking of which, you can add me on Facebook over here.

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On Chaos Theory

My dad, a fan of Chaos Theory, just sent me this interesting article about it and some of its history. Some of these things I already knew, but for the most part it was greatly revealing.
When I visit my parents home this winter, there will be a greater chance of me finally reading the pile of books he left on my desk a few months ago ;)

MATHEMATICS: CATASTROPHE THEORY, STRANGE ATTRACTORS, CHAOS

The following points are made by Nigel Calder (citation below):

1) Go out of Paris on the road towards Chartres and after 25 kilometers you will come to the Institut des Hautes Etudes Scientifiques at Bures-sur-Yvette. It occupies a quite small building surrounded by trees. Founded in 1958 in candid imitation of the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, it enables half a dozen lifetime professors to interact with 30 or more visitors in pondering new concepts in mathematics and theoretical physics. A former president, Marcel Boiteux, called it “a monastery where deep-sown seeds germinate and grow to maturity at their own pace.”

2) A recurring theme for the institute at Bures has been complicated behavior. In the 21st century this extends to describing how biological molecules — nucleic acids and proteins — fold themselves to perform precise functions. The mathematical monks in earlier days directed their attention towards physical and engineering systems that can often perform in complicated and unpredictable ways.

3) Catastrophe theory was invented at Bures-sur-Yvette in 1968. In the branch of mathematics concerned with flexible shapes, called topology, Rene Thom found origami-like ways of picturing abrupt changes in a system, such as the fracture of a girder or the capsizing of a ship. Changes that were technically catastrophic could be benign, for instance in the brain’s rapid switch from sleeping to waking. As the modes of sudden change became more numerous, the greater the number of factors affecting a system.

Continue reading ‘On Chaos Theory’

Russell’s teapot

If I were to suggest that between the Earth and Mars there is a china teapot revolving about the sun in an elliptical orbit, nobody would be able to disprove my assertion provided I were careful to add that the teapot is too small to be revealed even by our most powerful telescopes. But if I were to go on to say that, since my assertion cannot be disproved, it is an intolerable presumption on the part of human reason to doubt it, I should rightly be thought to be talking nonsense. If, however, the existence of such a teapot were affirmed in ancient books, taught as the sacred truth every Sunday, and instilled into the minds of children at school, hesitation to believe in its existence would become a mark of eccentricity and entitle the doubter to the attentions of the psychiatrist in an enlightened age or of the Inquisitor in an earlier time.

Bertrand Russell (1997). “Is There a God?”. in John Slater & Peter Köllner. The collected papers of Bertrand Russell. 11. Routledge. pp. 542–548. ISBN 978-0-415-09409-2.

blink-182 Smiley Stencil – Part 1

45 cm x 45 cm (17 in x 17 in)

Work in progress.

I’ll keep you posted ;)

Update

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I Vectorize Myself (All of the time)

Sometimes I wonder if I should really start worrying about my ego.

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[WordPress Tip] How to exclude children categories on a template

Yesterday I came across a problem while trying to get WordPress to show me only posts from the top level category without showing posts under sub-categories.

Let’s say I had a Category named Notebooks and under it there were Hewlett-Packard, Acer and Lenovo. Now what I wanted to do was to only display the posts that I published under Notebooks and not under Acer.

By default WordPress will show you the posts you published under Notebooks AND under Acer AND under Hewlett-Packard AND Lenovo, as if they were all posted under the same category (when I head to Hewlett-Packerd it will only show me posts under that category, of course).

After tens of hours of research (yeah), I found the function that could make my dream come true: is_category()

That function shows posts only from the category specified and NO OTHER ONE.

So if you want to modify a template to display posts only from the category you are calling and not display the posts from children categories (sub-categories), just change this:

<?php while (have_posts()) : the_post(); ?>

to this:

<?php while (have_posts()) : the_post(); if (in_category($cat)) { ?>

Then you have to change your endwhile:

<?php endwhile; ?>

to

<?php } endwhile; ?>

There were no direct answers to my problem on the WordPress Codex or anywhere else (that I could find).

A complete example:

<?php get_header(); ?>

<?php if (have_posts()) : ?>

<div class=”post”>

<h1><?php single_cat_title(); ?></h1>

<?php while (have_posts()) : the_post(); if (in_category($cat)) { ?>

<h2><a href=”<?php the_permalink() ?>” rel=”bookmark” title=”Permanent Link to <?php the_title(); ?>” class=”title”><?php the_title(); ?></a></h2>

<?php } endwhile; ?>

</div>

<?php else : ?>

<div class=”post”>

<h2>Not Found</h2>
<p class=”center”>Sorry, but you are looking for something that isn’t here.</p>
<center><?php include (TEMPLATEPATH . “/searchform.php”); ?></center>

</div>

<?php endif; ?>

</div>

<?php get_sidebar(); ?>

<?php get_footer(); ?>

This was done using WordPress 2.6.5

Change


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You give up, they give up

via fubiz

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[Review] Box Car Racer

Note: I just found this, lost between old papers from high school. I wrote this down from boredom two years ago. It isn’t that well written, and it may be incorrect in some places, but what the heck, I’m posting it. After all, I needed to be the person I was in order to become the person I am.

Have you ever felt that the world as we know it was just about to end?

Tom DeLonge, the frontman from Box Car Racer and Angels and Airwaves (formerly from pop-punk trio blink-182) was probably inspired by this thoughts when he wrote the self-titled debut and only album by Box Car Racer.
The album deals with subjects such as well, the end of the world, romantic stories where the singer offers safety and his company to his loved one, and even deals with depression and feeling of being overwhelmed by the events of our life.

The album came out during the first hiatus that blink-182 took back on 2002 after their Take Off Your Pants and Jacket promotion tour, when singer and guitarist Tom DeLonge suffered a back injury and was behold to stay home and rest. During that time, as claimed by DeLonge himself, he was going through a lot of things and struggling with pain, having a lot of powerful thoughts, many of them finally inspiring the songs that made their only album.

This album features lots of acoustic guitars, accompanied by heavy distorted guitars and unique powerful drumming by Travis Barker (also from blink-182).
Box Car Racer also counted with additional guitar duties by David Kennedy, and although all the bass parts on the album were played by Tom, on tour a bassist named Anthony Celestino played those parts.

Highlights from the album are:

  •  Watch the World: an optimistic song written about apocaliptic times where the singer offers everything he has to his loved one and believes that “they will make it through”.
  • Cat Like Thief: featuring Tim Armstrong from punk band Rancid on vocals, it counts with a simple guitar riff on loop that makes the melody even more interesting. It’s a great song overall.
  • Letters to God: this song is almost entirely played by Tom on his acoustic guitar and then breaks into heavy distorted guitars when reaching its end, making this song one of the most powerful songs on the record. It has that Box Car Racer trademark sound, it’s lyrically beautiful with the singer confessing his thoughts and saying that ‘maybe he doesn’t wanna go’. One of the saddest and most emotional song on the record.
  • There Is: one of the most romantic and sincere songs that were ever written. A completely acoustic song that deals with the need for someone and just singing yourself to calm and have the certainty that ‘there’s someone out there who feels just like you’.
  • Elevator: a very simple but yet impressive song that features Mark Hoppus (the third member from blink) on half the vocals. It is a very graphic narration of a man jumping from a building rooftop, told in first person (by Tom) and then from the view of a passer-by, therefore, in third person (by Mark).

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Watch the World, for your listening pleasure.
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