Tag Archive for 'philosophy'

For the moments I feel like letting go

This morning, while I was studying for my Logic class and since I was feeling fine I thought of writing myself a list of things to keep in mind next time I start to feel overwhelmed by everything around me. It served as an excuse to avoid studying, anyway.

  • You don’t know what is going to happen. You despise pseudo-sciences so you might as well admit that you cannot tell the future. Stop pretending that you know that you’re destined to fail if you openly claim that the sole idea of ‘destiny’ is ridiculous and disgusts you.
  • Remember how good it feels when you are calm. See how differently your thoughts can flow when you find yourself in a clear-thinking oasis. Get rid of your depression and anxiety and then try and refute your own depressive claims.
  • Don’t compare yourself. The reason why successful people actually succeed is because they stay loyal to their own goals. After you get rid of whatever is clouding your thoughts set some goals and start achieving them. Don’t be afraid of revising them and change them if you consider them relevant. Try not to change them that often or you’ll be missing the point of having them.

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My Philosophy – by Woody Allen

woody-allenA month ago or so, my sister left on my desk some old photocopies of a text titled “My Philosophy”, with no author. Since it’s Sunday and yesterday I learned that I did very well on my Sociology exam (90/100) and therefore I can relax a bit with my studying, I decided to give this text a look. It turned out to be a text by the renowned screenwriter, film director, actor, comedian, writer and musician, Woody Allen.

Although after the first read I couldn’t catch every concept on it, I’m hoping that after a few more readings I’ll be able to wholly understand it. You can read the whole text after the jump.

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Russell’s teapot

If I were to suggest that between the Earth and Mars there is a china teapot revolving about the sun in an elliptical orbit, nobody would be able to disprove my assertion provided I were careful to add that the teapot is too small to be revealed even by our most powerful telescopes. But if I were to go on to say that, since my assertion cannot be disproved, it is an intolerable presumption on the part of human reason to doubt it, I should rightly be thought to be talking nonsense. If, however, the existence of such a teapot were affirmed in ancient books, taught as the sacred truth every Sunday, and instilled into the minds of children at school, hesitation to believe in its existence would become a mark of eccentricity and entitle the doubter to the attentions of the psychiatrist in an enlightened age or of the Inquisitor in an earlier time.

Bertrand Russell (1997). “Is There a God?”. in John Slater & Peter Köllner. The collected papers of Bertrand Russell. 11. Routledge. pp. 542–548. ISBN 978-0-415-09409-2.